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HPSCHD-L  July 2017

HPSCHD-L July 2017

Subject:

Re: Plastic Jack Provenance

From:

Peter Bavington <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 07:58:27 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (88 lines)

On 21/07/2017 00:52, Martin Spaink wrote:
> Hi all, I read BOLTON on the jack.

Yes, they are Bolton jacks. These were designed and made by David Bolton 
of Middlesborough, UK, for use in his own instruments and in the large 
number of harpsichord and virginal kits that he produced. David died in 
February 2008, and as far as I know the jacks are no longer made. They 
are, in fact, pretty serviceable. I may have a few odd spares, Martin, 
if you need them - but it is a long time since I checked my stock!

In case anyone is interested, I have pasted in an obituary of David from 
the British Clavichord Society Newsletter below my signature.

-- 
Peter Bavington
Clavichord Maker
291 Sprowston Mews
LONDON
E7 9AE
www.peter-bavington.co.uk


OBITUARY
David Hugh Bolton (1930–2008)
Christopher Stembridge, Bressanone, Italy
News of the sudden death of BCS member David Bolton on 23 February 
arrived just as the previous Newsletter was going to press: sadly, he 
never lived to see his article in that issue appear in print. Many BCS 
members will have been introduced to the pleasures of owning and playing 
a clavichord or harpsichord through making one of his kit instruments, 
from the instrument making courses that he ran, or from his 
participation in NORVIS, the early-music summer school based in Durham. 
The following appreciation by Christopher Stembridge first appeared in 
Early Music Review, and we are grateful for his permission to reprint it 
here.
I first met David Bolton at the Early Music Exhibition in Earl’s Court 
in 1991 when I begged him to sell me his unfinished demonstration model 
of a short-octave fretted clavichord. This was badly needed in a 
newly-independent Estonia. I also told him that I needed kits for many 
of my students for making a later type of fretted clavichord, based on 
Hubert or similar. He would think about it. Two or three years later he 
came to my house in Italy with the prototype. We spent a week working 
out the right stringing, and since then I and many of my students and 
acquaintances have acquired such instruments in kit or finished form 
from him. It is a great success. I once recorded on such an instrument 
in David’s bathroom in Middlesbrough!
When, some years later, I asked him to help me find a way of getting 
such things to Russia he saw little point in trying to send kits there 
and suggested that we should find a competent craftsman. He would be 
happy to provide plans and instructions and would even consider coming 
over to help people finish their instruments. He spoke a beautiful 
old-fashioned Russian – so convincingly that the ticket-office at the 
Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg did not think of trying to exact from 
him the inflated foreign tourist rate when he went there a couple of 
years ago. He had learned Russian (along with Colin Tilney and others) 
in a class that formed part of his National Service. He subsequently 
visited Russia several times as a rep. for I.C.I., in whose employ he 
worked from 1954 until 1980 when they paid for him to retrain as a cello 
teacher. In Holland (1970-72) he had got interested in harpsichord 
making, and after assembling a Zuckermann kit realized that there were 
things in it that needn’t be, so decided to design a ‘basic kit’ to save 
shipping costs for the customers.
Looking for a good woodworker in Russia proved to be like searching for 
a needle in a haystack. As my friend the Dresden organ builder Kristian 
Wegscheider pointed out, Stalin had destroyed the artisan tradition. In 
Soviet Russia doors, furniture and even musical instruments were 
produced in factories. Kristian suggested I should look for someone 
working as a restorer in a museum. On my next visit to Moscow I met 
Dmitri Belov, who not only proudly showed me some eighteenth-century 
furniture he had restored in Arkhangelskoye museum outside Moscow, but 
also proved to be completing his studies in organ and composition at the 
Moscow Conservatory.
David invited Dmitri to stay in Middlesbrough for a month and learn how 
to make his first clavichord. The visit was a great success. It spawned 
great activity back in Moscow, and many Bolton-Belov clavichords now 
exist, one of which may be seen at the Gnessin Academy of Music. David 
made his last trip to Russia shortly before last Christmas when he 
helped Dmitry make a pedal clavichord and spinet.
He has played an important role in helping early musicians, especially 
those of modest means, to acquire instruments. I consider his 
clavichords to be amongst the best made in recent times.

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Note:  opinions  expressed on HPSCHD-L are those of the  individual con-
tributors and not necessarily  those of the list owners  nor of the Uni-
versity of Iowa.  For a brief  summary of list  commands, send mail to
[log in to unmask]  saying  HELP .
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

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